how can I get birth control services
  • Birth control and emergency contraception are available free or low cost at Title X clinics if your insurance doesn't cover birth control or if you are uninsured.
  • Some types of emergency contraception are available over-the-counter (see below). Other forms of emergency contraception require a visit with a health care provider.
  • All health care providers keep your information private unless there are concerns about your safety. 
  • There are several different types of emergency contraception.
  • Some factors to consider when choosing emergency contraception include when you last had sex, your weight, future birth control plans, and if you are breastfeeding.
  • Emergency birth control options include pills or an intrauterine device (IUD).
    • The levonorgestrel pill (brand names:  Plan B One Step, Take Action, My Way, and others) is the only emergency contraception that is available over the counter. It should be taken within 3 days of condomless sex. The sooner you take it, the more effective it is. If your weight is above 126 lbs., you should check your body mass index (BMI) BMI calculator. If your BMI is greater than 26, you should ask your health care provider about the ulipristal pill or a copper IUD. 
    • The ulipristal pill (brand names:  ella, ellaOne, and Fibristal) is prescribed by a health care provider and used within 5 days of unprotected sex.
    • A copper IUD (brand name:  Paragard) can be placed by a health care provider within 5 days of unprotected sex.
  • The most effective reversible birth control methods are the implant and IUDs. These methods are about 99% effective.
    • The implant works for 3 years.
    • IUDs are small T shaped devices that are placed in your uterus. There are several different kinds, that can work anywhere from 3 to 12 years depending on the product you choose.
  • Many other types of birth control are available including the pill, patch, and vaginal ring which are about 92% effective and the shot which is about 97% effective. These are all good options, but these methods are more prone to human error that can reduce their effectiveness.
  • Only abstinence or the use of male and female condoms can prevent STDs and HIV.
  • Condoms can sometimes fail, but if used correctly and combined with a second form of birth control, they can be very effective.
  • Permanent birth control procedures include vasectomy and tubal ligation.
  • There are many things to consider when deciding which birth control to use including effectiveness, ease, and side effects. Discuss your options with a health care provider to pick the best method for you.
  • Only abstinence and the use of male or female condoms can protect you from pregnancy, STDs, and HIV. In addition to condoms, a second form of birth control is important for the best pregnancy protection. Other forms of birth control do not protect against HIV or STDs.
  • Using condoms correctly is easy if you know how.
  • You can also reduce your risk of STDs and HIV by reducing your number of sex partners.
  • HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is effective to prevent HIV if you think you may have future exposures to HIV.
  • HIV post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) is effective if used within 72 hours after an exposure to HIV. Your health care provider may be able to provide PEP, or you can contact the Denver Sexual Health Clinic (303) 602-3540 or go to an urgent/emergency care clinic.